Peptides aren’t only for cosmetic use. Such substances are also being widely used in the field of medicine, and in recent years, throughout Canada, the study of peptides has been applied to the battle against cancer.

What You Need To Know About Peptides and Cancer

Peptides aren’t only for cosmetic use. Such substances are also being widely used in the field of medicine, and in recent years, throughout Canada, the study of peptides has been applied to the battle against cancer. Several studies and clinical tests are underway to look deeply into the anti-angiogenic properties of peptides. So far, it has been discovered that these groups of peptides have the ability to develop various simulations of angiogenesis.

The process of angiogenesis is a key stage in the development and growth of malignant tissues and cells, which eventually lead to full blown cancer. It is this process that doctors use to gauge the extent to which cancerous cells have spread in the body.

Numerous researchers and studies have suggested that when blood flow to the tumors is limited by interfering with the process of metastasis and angiogenesis, the growth of tumors can then be regulated, and with time, stopped completely. Most drugs currently used in the market as angiogenesis simply target certain stimulators by limiting their ability to reduce the spread of tumors, and consequently prolong the patient’s life.

Some of the peptides, which have already developed, as well as those that are still under development, have been discovered to have various anti-angiogenic properties, and such results have been validated by trials on animals, and other living organisms.

The anti-angiogenic peptides operate simply by stopping the angiogenic responses brought about by different types of growth hormones. They come in the way of the operations of anti-tumorigenic properties against the various kinds of tumors and cancerous cells. Lots of research by scientists has also come to the conclusion that the actions of anti-angiogenic and anti-tumorigenic normally take place at the C-terminal sequence of the peptides, and that they are normally assisted by intracellular cathespin L and B in the cancerous cells.